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Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena -1 First International Symposium

ISBN:
1-56700-135-1 (Print)

EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL STUDY OF A CONDENSING FLOW IN A DEVELOPING WALL JET

Paul B. Hoke
Department of Mechanical Engineering Michigan State University East Lansing, Ml 48824, USA

Wang Qingtian
Department of Mechanical Engineering Michigan State University East Lansing, Ml 48824, USA

John J. McGrath
Department of Mechanical Engineering Michigan State University East Lansing, Ml 48824, USA

Bashar S. AbdulNour
Visteon Automotive Systems Ford Motor Company Plymouth, Ml 48170, USA

Abstract

An experimental and computational investigation of a developing (0< x/w <10.8), two-dimensional wall jet is presented for the following three steady-state situations: isothermal flow, flow past a cold wall in the absence of condensation and flow past a cold wall with condensation. Detailed velocity and temperature measurements are made using hot-wire as well as dual probe hot-wire/cold-wire anemometry. Local temperature compensation of hot-wire velocity measurements using a dual hot-wire/cold-wire probe was successfully implemented. The experimental results are compared with computational results for the first two cases using the computational fluid dynamics program FLUENT© 5.
For isothermal flow, the measured time-averaged stream-wise velocity distributions match previously reported data well. Neither the presence of a thermal gradient nor condensation significantly changed the measured time-averaged stream-wise velocity or the stream-wise normal stress distributions. In contrast, the non-dimensional, time-averaged temperature distribution across the jet was altered by the presence of condensation for the conditions studied.
The computational results reveal that both a realizable k-ε model and a Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) are able to predict the measured time-averaged, stream-wise velocity distributions well. The RSM reproduces the measured stream-wise normal stress more accurately than the k-ε model. Both CFD models are capable of predicting the measured time-averaged temperature distribution across the jet to within 6% of the temperature difference between the wall and the surroundings.
Future work will focus on the development of CFD models to predict condensation phenomena in developing jet flows for comparison with more detailed experimental data.